.
4th Royal Eltham

 

Lighting

(Click on a picture)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Battery lamps

No risk of unexpected incineration! cheap to buy and most have quite a powerful beam, just right for annoying your friends around the camp fire. The only problem is, the cost and life of the batteries. Just remember to switch it off before you go to sleep and don't annoy your friends too often, it will last for a whole week's camp. 

 

Top of page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gas (or Gaz) lamps

Produces light by burning LPG gas through a delicate mantle (LPG = Liquid Petroleum Gas, NOT Low Pressure Gas). They give off quite a powerful light but don't take kindly to being thrown about as this will break the mantle. There is also a glass globe which is easily broken. If you knock one over, it will let you know it doesn't much like it! and the top gets very, very hot. Spare mantles should always be kept and changing them can be quite fiddly, damage to the globe could result if a mantle is left holed. They are quite cheap to run and, if looked after, will give long service. Buy one with automatic ignition and use it outside your tent, the light will shine through.

How to change the gas cartridge

Note

Top of page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dual Fuel Lamps (Petrol or own brand fuel)

Work on a similar principal to a gas lamp. They burn the fuel through a delicate mantle to give off light. The big difference is that they burn petrol or a similar fuel, which is pressurized by pumping air into the tank. A small mistake could result in an explosive situation, definitely not for kids. There is also a glass globe which is easily broken. However, they are very cheap to run and, if looked after, will give long service. The "generator" bar which heats the fuel will eventually need replacing, this can be quite expensive. Always carry spare mantles, which are quite simple to change, damage to the globe could result if a mantle is left holed.. The top gets very, very hot. Great for adults, but keep and fill them outside of the tent, the light will shine through. Occasional pumping may be required as fuel is burnt and the pressure drops.

Note

Top of page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tilley Lamps (paraffin)

Again, work on a similar principal to the gas lamp. They burn fuel inside a delicate mantle. Unlike a dual fuel lamp, these need to be heated up. In the picture you may be able to see a small jar, this contains a priming torch which is soaked in methylated spirits. You clip the torch beneath the mantle and light it, once the flame begins to die down you turn the fuel on and start pumping. They are very cheap to run and, if looked after, will give long service. Parts can be a problem to find nowadays, and both the mantle and the glass globe are very breakable. Always carry spare mantles, which are quite simple to change, damage to the globe could result if a mantle is left holed. The lamp will burn for about eight hours on a pint of paraffin. If the fuel is turned on before the correct temperature is reached, liquid paraffin will ignite and cause a flame several feet high. Also, they do not like being knocked over and require "pumping up" several times during a night. The top gets very, very hot. Light, fill and use them outside of the tent, the light will shine through.

Note

Top of page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hurricane Lamp (Paraffin)

One of the oldest forms of lighting still available, it is almost what the name suggests. Very simple, reliable and easy to use. Stores fuel (paraffin) in the tank at the base which is drawn up a wick and burnt. They do not give a very powerful light but are very useful for night lights and, will burn all night on one fill (about half a pint). Not to be filled or used inside a tent and must be secured. If they fall over, the resulting spillage could form quite a large puddle and ignite.

Note

Top of page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LED Lamps

LED (Light Emitting Diode) lamps are relatively new on the market but definitely a must have for anyone who has been left in the dark half way through Summer Camp. Even the smallest will light constantly for several days or even weeks. They use very little power.

The down-side is their initial cost. They can be quite a bit more expensive but they will pay for themselves very quickly because of their battery life.

The light given off is nowhere near as bright as most conventional lamps but it is quite possible to read with it and it will light up a tent enough to see what you are looking for.                    

OR, as demonstrated by members of our own Troop

Will effectively annoy your mate across the fire when continually aimed in their face and will adequately give a spooky illumination when pointed into various orifices such as ears, nose and mouth!

Top of page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liquid fuel lamps, if misused can be very dangerous. The question to ask yourself is;    

"Do you really want to spend your last moments running around looking for someone to put you out!"

 

Top of page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Changing the gas cartridge.  

NEVER CHANGE THE CARTRIDGE INSIDE YOUR TENT

If you have been using the burner, wait a few minutes for it to cool down. Unscrew the burner assembly from the base, listening carefully (In the unlikely event that you hear gas begin to escape screw the thing back together and take it to a main dealer for repair). The burner will detach from the tank. Once this has happened, unscrew the plate at the base of the tank (this can also be a bayonet fixing), drop out the old cartridge, insert the new and replace the bottom plate. Before attaching the burner head, inspect the rubber "O" ring which forms a seal onto the tank. If it is in anyway damaged it must be replaced before the tank is re-attached.

 

Top of page